Silly stories, words, and images in the life of a medical student and her friends


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Aug 21, 2014
@ 1:36 pm
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LadyKay’s Guide to the IM Clerkship

ladykaymd:

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So I know I promised this AGES ago—but I just got to it. *Insert generic excuse about being a busy third year medical student here*. 

But better late than never, eh?? 

This guide includes everything from an example of the schema I use to keep my own notes on my patients to the resources I used for the IM shelf to an example of a day on IM clerkship. 

I think for a lot of people IM can be a very intimidating clerkship because of the sheer SCOPE of information you have to know for it! I hope this little guide helps you a little. :) 

Read More

Super accurate and better than anything I could ever write! Awesome! :D


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Aug 21, 2014
@ 9:31 am
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3,174 notes

molecularbiologistproblems:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.
Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.
And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

This makes me sad.


My sister loves field work, and to hear this makes me so sad and concerned.

molecularbiologistproblems:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.

Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.

And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

This makes me sad.

My sister loves field work, and to hear this makes me so sad and concerned.

(via modernathena90)


Video

Aug 21, 2014
@ 8:45 am
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1,796 notes

I couldn’t agree more. Also, Korra!

(Source: 16stolenxpaperthin, via -everdeen)


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Aug 21, 2014
@ 7:30 am
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133 notes

Obstetrics conference…or that’s what she said?

aspiringdoctors:

wayfaringmd:

"Hands and knees is my favorite position…much less risk of tear."

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"Just get in there."

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"I just put my fingers in the vagina and drive."

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"Women may feel that it is not working in this position. They might not be getting the push they need. They may also say this feels amazing and this is the right position."

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If a female physician is saying these things… technically it’s both.

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This is the best thing I’ve read in a week. Aside from physician unicorns. This is it.


Video

Aug 21, 2014
@ 6:15 am
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529 notes

thenotquitedoctor:

Dr. Kevin Ahern (premed advisor at Oregon State) has a series of videos on YouTube that are absolutely excellent for banishing pre-interview jitters. He has some wonderful advice about how to prepare for an interview, how to dress, body language, how to handle tough questions, etc.—you name the scenario and he has covered it. 

I watched his videos before my interviews and felt much more confident. I would say his videos are the next best thing to a personal coach (seriously who can afford that?) and mock interviews. It’s a 2-3 hour time investment, but I was glad I watched them. Hope they might be helpful for those of you who are still anxiously awaiting interviews or who are preparing to apply next cycle. 

Here’s part 2 of the video as well!

(via thenotquitedoctor)


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Aug 21, 2014
@ 12:49 am
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23 notes

Tonight was a good night

  1. Went to an internal med residency info session for 4th years at a cool restaurant. Free food, free advice, free wine? I’m there!
  2. My favorite resident of all time was there! He asked me how my neuro rotation went, and we talked about my super-eccentric attending. My resident then told me that his goal is to hug that attending once without getting maimed. #lifegoals
  3. My other favorite resident (I HAVE MULTIPLE FAVORITES) texted me to commiserate on how to sell binders and textbooks to first years. Which was pretty hilarious.
  4. Now I will study for Step 2 CS and my neuro shelf, eep!

Link

Aug 20, 2014
@ 8:45 am
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217 notes

Doctors today: Young, broke and human »

mymedlife:

So the next time a young doctor walks into the room, give her the benefit of the doubt. She may be 20-something, driving a 2000 Toyota, with half of her paycheck paying off student loan debt. If you look hard enough you may see the “age lines” she and the next generation of young doctors acquired through the many sleepless nights and delayed gratification invested in taking care of you and your loved ones.

This is important


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Aug 20, 2014
@ 7:30 am
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203 notes

mynotes4usmle:

Bacterias & Tx

Hi guys, just wanted to let you know that I did this really fast, so if there’s something wrong let me know! thanks :)


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Aug 20, 2014
@ 6:15 am
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672 notes

Medical school is like a second puberty. It’s overwhelming, confusing and by the end, your personality has changed so much that you barely recognize the person smiling back at you in that photo from the first day.

— An openly honest 4th year whilst briefing a group of overly enthusiastic first years on clinical years. (via sterileplayground)

This is so accurate. I’m still trying to figure out who this new me is, but I know that who I was feels like centuries ago

(via miss-caduceus)


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Aug 20, 2014
@ 12:54 am
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83 notes

on classist bullshit, part 2

descantforhope:

Today I went to a new hair salon, where I met a charming beautician who had been in and out of the hair industry for years and years. During a recent out-time she worked housekeeping for the surgical wards at one of the local hospitals. 

She talked to me of the time and the care that it took to make everything clean. About how she hated the smell of MRSA. How it baffled her that not everyone could smell MRSA. Her scissors flew expertly as she detailed who she’d picked out to be her trauma surgeon, who would be her anesthesiologist, who was the best at small things like flu shots and IV access. She talked of who was nice, and who was not, and which wards had the best staff. Beautiful, detailed gossip as befits the barber’s chair. When I asked her why she left the hospital, the top problem on her list was the rampant classism she experienced. 

Despite the fact that this lovely woman was well educated in her field, with decades of experience in making people feel beautiful, despite the fact that she had owned a business prior to working in the hospital, despite the fact that she provided work that makes the hospital useable, people talked down to her. They called her names. They assumed she was stupid because she worked in housekeeping. They were inconsiderate. They pretended she didn’t exist.

You all know my feelings on classism by now, but let me reiterate why what I heard today is and will always be important: She is a human being. She was doing work she enjoyed at the hospital. Elitist dehumanizing techniques were a large part of what made her work so uncomfortable that she left her position. 

We can be the solution to this problem. Treat people as if they’re people, regardless of the position they hold in the workforce or the economy. 

The old 1910 quote starts the conversation we’ve all heard before:

He will show his goodness in the kindly consideration he shows those less favored than himself. It is the way one treats his inferiors more than the way he treats his equals which reveals one’s real character.

                                            -Rev. Charles Bayard Miliken

But the true end of this thought is that we must value people, regardless of their station in this class structure. All people have worth, and this worth is not dependent on the work that they do. 

^Fucking. important. right. here.